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THE BRIDGE WORLD

DEFENSIVE PROBLEM #19

Rubber bridge
East dealer
Both sides vulnerable

NORTH (dummy)
A Q 10 8 4
Q 9 8 7
K
A K 9
EAST (you)
J 9 7 3 2
6 5 4 2
7
Q J 10
SOUTHWESTNORTHEAST
Pass
1 5 6 Pass
PassPass

West leads the diamond ace: king, seven, three. West continues with the diamond queen; dummy ruffs with the heart queen.

Plan your defense.

Solution

NORTH
A Q 10 8 4
Q 9 8 7
K
A K 9
WEST
5

A Q 10 9 8 6 5 4 2
8 4 3
EAST
J 9 7 3 2
6 5 4 2
7
Q J 10
SOUTH
K 6
A K J 10 3
J 3
7 6 5 2

A WAITING GAME. With the advantage of discarding after the dummy, East should not throw a spade or a club until dummy does. A premature black-suit discard gives declarer a twelfth trick. The correct defense is to underruff at trick two and hope for a black-suit trick later. (This hope depends on West's guarding the third round of clubs, as in the diagram.)

(Based on a deal and analysis from the 1964 National Intercollegiate Bridge Tournament by William S. Root and Lawrence Rosler.)

LEARN BRIDGE

Our learning center web pages are dedicated to teaching the game of bridge. There are lessons for first-time players, as well as for those at the elementary and intermediate levels. You can find the appropriate section, and proceed through the lessons.

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